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Meier, Bernardus : Cipriani Rore Opera Omnia, Vol I : Motets

American Institute of Musicology (AIM), 1959


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Citeert de volgende bronnen van werken van De Rore

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1 : {Meier_I} - 1549_c : 'Il Terzo Libro di Motetti a cinque voci di Cipriano de Rore, et de altri excellentissimi Musici, novament ristampato, con una bona gionta de Motetti novi. In Venetia appresso de Antonio Gardane, 1549.'
- p. II

2 : {Meier_I} - R1545 : 'Cipriani Rore Musici Excellentissimi Motetta nunc primum summa diligentia in lumen prodita. Venetiis apud Antonium Gardane. MDXXXXV'
- p. II

3 : {RISM} - 1544_06 : 'Cipriani musici eccelentissimi cum quibusdam aliis doctis authoribus motectorum nunc primum maxima diligentia in lucem exeuntem Liber primus quinque vocum.'
- p. I : Meier schrijft na de titel de volgende code tussen haakjes : (= S 1544a); dit is wellicht een pre-RISM code.

4 : {RISM} - 1549_08 : 'Il terzo libro di Motetti a cinque voci di Cipriano de Rore, et de altri eccellentissimi musici, novamente ristampato, con una buona gionta de motetti novi.'
- p. II


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Citeert de volgende werken van De Rore

1 : Angustiae mihi sunt undique - Deas aeterne, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 4 Refs., , +T]
- p. V : 'It is also noteworthy that in some cases dissonances (suspensions of 6 5 or 6/4 5/3 , related in each case to the really lowest voice) are used in the sense of affective symbolism, as for example in Angustiae mihi sunt undique (bars 61-64: falsum testimonium, and 81f.: malitiose), Domine quis habitabit (bars 49-51: malum), In die tribulationis meae (bars 36f., 38f.: prae ladirimis), Levavi oculos meos (bars 94f.: ab omni malo), Quanti mercenarii (bars 20-27: Ego autem hic fame pereo) and Tribularer, si nescirem (bars 73f.: dolorum meorum). With this use of dissonances Rore apparently follows the steps of his teacher Willaert, whose motets too contain passages of this kind, when the text suggests such a procedure.'
- p. IV : 'In a similar way we find katabasis in the words in morte (Usquequo Domine, Cantus, bars 8 5 f.), or on mors mihi est (Angustiae mihi sunt undique, bars 29-33). In this last case it is used with long measures and Fauxbourdon texture. '
- p. IV : 'In bars 68-72 of Angustiae mihi sunt undique, at the words et ecce morior, we find at one and the same time the use of fauxbourdon texture, low register and the semitone, d’-e flat', which is foreign to the mode.'
- p. V : 'The fact that commixtio is an unusual feature is stressed in bars 53-59 of Angustiae mihi sunt undique, where it is applied at the words qui absconditorum es cognitor in the melody of Tenor, Bassus, Quintus and Altus. AIthough by no means obvious here, the fifth la-re (d-G or d'-g) does replace the prevailing species sol-ut (c-f), while cadences on g are continually avoided.'

2 : Beatus homo - Longitudo dierum - Dominus sapientia, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 3 Refs., , +T]
- p. III : 'Particularly striking in these early works is the skill with which Rore often illustrates the pictorial or expressive features of the text by the so-called musical figures. Figures of hypotyposis are easily recognised, for instance in the setting of the words pacifica (Beatus homo, bars 89-91), in curribus (Exaudiat me Dominus, bars 110-116: Circulatio, from the turning wheels), eadem lumina (Hesperice cum laeta, bars 90-92: the two eyes correspond to the Quintus-Bassus duet). '
- p. III : 'Effective use is made of the juxtaposition of high and low tonal levels, for instance in bars 13 3 ff. of the motet Beatus homo, or at the words eruperunt abyssi, where the soprano descends suddenly into the plagal reaches of what has hitherto been an authentic mode. In the following section et nubes rore concrescunt, the opening imitation moves again within the limits of the authentic mode, though it obviously prefers its higher notes.'
- p. II : 'Modus : 1, transposed'

3 : Clamabat autem mulier, 5vv (Motet) - [Rore?, 5, 2 Refs., , +T]
- p. 143 : 'Rore ?'

4 : Dissimulare etiam sperasti - Quin etiam hiberno - Me ne fugis, 5-7vv (Motet) - [7, 5 Refs., , +Tnfe]
- p. III : 'The introductory words Illuxit nunc sacra dies, as well as the words celebranda per orbem (bars 13-15) and salus (23 f.) used further on in the same motet, are obviously emphasised by rapidly ascending movement or high position, particularly in the Cantus.'

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5 : Domine Deus - Quis enim tibi - Tu ergo rerum, 5vv (Motet) - [1, 2 Refs., , +Tne]
- p. IV : 'The introduction of accidentals foreign to the mode often leads to the formation of irregular Phrygian cadences, for instance in bars 130-135 of In convertendo Dominus (Euntes ibant et flebant), bars 45-48 and 100-104 of Plange quasi virgo (et amara calde), bars 55-64 of Quanti mercenarii (pecavi), and bars 102f. of Levavi oculos meos (ab omni malo). Also worth mentioning is the music of the question Quid fecisti? (Domine Deus, bars 65-73): together with two regular cadences on the final G (second mode transposed), there are irregular Phrygian cadences in a and d.
Still more unusal is the setting of the words dolorum meorum in corde meo (Tribularer, si nescirem, bars 72ff.): the Phrygian cadence in a which is, strictly speaking, not allowed in the third mode, is followed by a second cadence on d, still further away from the normal Phrygian closes. In contrast to this, Rore makes use of the Phrygian cadences d, a, and e at the end of the section of the motet O altitudo divitiarum beginning with the words et investigabiles vice eius (bars 33-48). All these cadences deviate from the norm adopted by the second mode transposed, though admittedly the cadence on e is somewhat disguised by the cadential progressions of the Cantus and Bassus.'

6 : Domine quis habitabit - Ad nihilum deductus est, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 1 Ref., , +T]
- p. V : 'It is also noteworthy that in some cases dissonances (suspensions of 6 5 or 6/4 5/3 , related in each case to the really lowest voice) are used in the sense of affective symbolism, as for example in Angustiae mihi sunt undique (bars 61-64: falsum testimonium, and 81f.: malitiose), Domine quis habitabit (bars 49-51: malum), In die tribulationis meae (bars 36f., 38f.: prae ladirimis), Levavi oculos meos (bars 94f.: ab omni malo), Quanti mercenarii (bars 20-27: Ego autem hic fame pereo) and Tribularer, si nescirem (bars 73f.: dolorum meorum). With this use of dissonances Rore apparently follows the steps of his teacher Willaert, whose motets too contain passages of this kind, when the text suggests such a procedure.'

7 : Exaudiat me Dominus - Impleat Dominus, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 3 Refs., , +T]
- p. III : 'Particularly striking in these early works is the skill with which Rore often illustrates the pictorial or expressive features of the text by the so-called musical figures. Figures of hypotyposis are easily recognised, for instance in the setting of the words pacifica (Beatus homo, bars 89-91), in curribus (Exaudiat me Dominus, bars 110-116: Circulatio, from the turning wheels), eadem lumina (Hesperice cum laeta, bars 90-92: the two eyes correspond to the Quintus-Bassus duet). '
- p. III : 'A further example of this type of contrast is provided by the upper voice of Exaudiat me Dominus, bars 133-144. The text reads, significantly enough: . .. et ceciderunt: nos autem surreximus, et erecti sumus, et erecti sumus. This is illustrated in the music by katabasis and low position on the one hand, with further episodic entry of the plagal range, and on the other by a melodie line which continually moves higher as phrase succeeds phrase (e '-a', a *-d '-b \ e '-c"-b *). In this chain of rising phrases, the final link is forged by the ascent from e to c" in the melody which illustrates the words Domine, salvos nos fac.'
- p. IV : 'The arrangement of the superius in bars 51-54 of the motet Exaudiat me Dominus, at the words Tribuat mihi secundum cor meum, corresponds to the rhetorical 'Topos of Selfabnegation'. The effect of this katabasis is heightened by the simultaneous introduction of a commixtio primi toni, in other words a mode whose final lies below that of the otherwise prevailing fourth church mode.'

8 : Hesperiae com laeta - Quis mihi te similem, 5vv (Motet) - [1, 4 Refs., ]
- p. III : 'Particularly striking in these early works is the skill with which Rore often illustrates the pictorial or expressive features of the text by the so-called musical figures. Figures of hypotyposis are easily recognised, for instance in the setting of the words pacifica (Beatus homo, bars 89-91), in curribus (Exaudiat me Dominus, bars 110-116: Circulatio, from the turning wheels), eadem lumina (Hesperice cum laeta, bars 90-92: the two eyes correspond to the Quintus-Bassus duet). '
- p. IV-V : 'The employment of unusual cadences brings us to a further method of relating word and tone, which was apparently widely used in the present motets, namely the commixtio tonorum inspired by pictorial or expressive elements in the text. Already Nulla scientia melior provides an impressive example at the words Nihil recte existimat, qui se ipsum ignorat (bars 94-108). The imitations starting on f and c (together with their octave transpositions), the melody formed from the fifth c'-f (c’'-f') and the fourth f'-c' (f"-c", f-c), and the cadences on F of this section (bars 97f., 101 f., 103 f.) belong to the fifth mode, which occurs here as a conscious break with the basic principle of adhering to the mode chosen for the composition. Such a change from the first mode transposed to the upper fourth (G, with b flat) can only be due to consideration for the text. This is true also of the cadence on G in bars 101 f. of Usquequo Domine (praevalui adversus eum) and the unprepared appearance of the fifth a'-e'' (re-la) instead of g-d" (ut-sol) in the superius of the motet Quid gloriaris in malitia (bars 67 ff., Propterea Deus destruet te) - Commixtio of the first with the third mode appears in the present motets particularly in Hesperia cum laeta: here the introduction of the third mode is bound up with the textlines Et modo divitias miratur fertilis agri (bars 21-29) and Quis mihi te similem pinxit, mea dulcis imago? (bars 58-71), and finally with the concluding distich (bars 96ff.).
The return to the first mode is made by bringing in imitative motifs, whose melody is formed from this mode's species of fifth, re-la, before the entry of cadence on d, as in bars 29f. (Tenor, Quintus) and the imitative groups of bars 69ff. and 107ff. It is also in bars 55-57 of the motet In Domino confido (third mode) that we expect a cadence on d at the words Justus autem quid fecit?" ending the prima pars, but instead we get a turn to G on the final chord, a change only to be found otherwise at a „fuggir la cadenza". Thus Rore increases here the impression of confusion. The fact that „commixtio" is an unusual feature is stressed in bars 53-59 of Angustiae mihi sunt undique, where it is applied at the words „qui absconditorum es cognitor" in the melody of Tenor, Bassus, Quintus and Altus. AIthough by no means obvious here, the fifth la-re (d-G or d'-g) does replace the prevailing species sol-ut (c-f), while cadences on g are continually avoided.
The return to the first mode is made by bringing in imitative motifs, whose melody is formed from this mode's species of fifth, re-la, before the entry of cadence on d, as in bars 29f. (Tenor, Quintus) and the imitative groups of bars 69ff. and 107ff. '

9 : Illuxit nunc sacra dies, 5vv (Motet) - [2, 1 Ref., , +T]
- p. III : 'The introductory words Illuxit nunc sacra dies, as well as the words celebranda per orbem (bars 13-15) and salus (23 f.) used further on in the same motet, are obviously emphasised by rapidly ascending movement or high position, particularly in the Cantus.'

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10 : In convertendo Dominus - Converte, Domine, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 4 Refs., , +Tne]
- p. IV : 'The introduction of accidentals foreign to the mode often leads to the formation of irregular Phrygian cadences, for instance in bars 130-135 of In convertendo Dominus (Euntes ibant et flebant), bars 45-48 and 100-104 of Plange quasi virgo (et amara calde), bars 55-64 of Quanti mercenarii (pecavi), and bars 102f. of Levavi oculos meos (ab omni malo). Also worth mentioning is the music of the question Quid fecisti? (Domine Deus, bars 65-73): together with two regular cadences on the final G (second mode transposed), there are irregular Phrygian cadences in a and d.
Still more unusal is the setting of the words dolorum meorum in corde meo (Tribularer, si nescirem, bars 72ff.): the Phrygian cadence in a which is, strictly speaking, not allowed in the third mode, is followed by a second cadence on d, still further away from the normal Phrygian closes. In contrast to this, Rore makes use of the Phrygian cadences d, a, and e at the end of the section of the motet O altitudo divitiarum beginning with the words et investigabiles vice eius (bars 33-48). All these cadences deviate from the norm adopted by the second mode transposed, though admittedly the cadence on e is somewhat disguised by the cadential progressions of the Cantus and Bassus.'
- p. IV : 'Semitones too are powerful aids in the portrayal of emotion, as in bars 114-122 of In convertendo Dominus at the words qui seminant in ladirymis. '
- p. IV : 'This use of anabasis is no longer directiy pictorial but has acquired an expressive significance in the setting of the word laetantes (In convertendo Dominus, bars 80-90), coupled as it is with short measures and melismatically arranged text.'

11 : In die tribultionis meae, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 1 Ref., , +T]
- p. V : 'It is also noteworthy that in some cases dissonances (suspensions of 6 5 or 6/4 5/3 , related in each case to the really lowest voice) are used in the sense of affective symbolism, as for example in Angustiae mihi sunt undique (bars 61-64: falsum testimonium, and 81f.: malitiose), Domine quis habitabit (bars 49-51: malum), In die tribulationis meae (bars 36f., 38f.: prae ladirimis), Levavi oculos meos (bars 94f.: ab omni malo), Quanti mercenarii (bars 20-27: Ego autem hic fame pereo) and Tribularer, si nescirem (bars 73f.: dolorum meorum). With this use of dissonances Rore apparently follows the steps of his teacher Willaert, whose motets too contain passages of this kind, when the text suggests such a procedure.'

12 : In Domino confido - Dominus in templo sancto suo, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 3 Refs., , +T]
- p. V : 'It is also in bars 55-57 of the motet In Domino confido (third mode) that we expect a cadence on d at the words Justus autem quid fecit? ending the prima pars, but instead we get a turn to G on the final chord, a change only to be found otherwise at a fuggir la cadenza. Thus Rore increases here the impression of confusion.
- p. III : 'Katabasis is used in the introductory imitations of Itala qua cecidit, and moreover the melismatic, descending melodie line of pluet (In Domino confido, bars 101-103) should probably be interpreted in the same way.'
- p. V : 'Traces of the modern dualism of major and minor are to be found clearly enough in a few motets belonging to the third mode. Thus we find several cadences on G and C one after the other in Tribularer, si nescirem (bars 29-40 and 80-91). Although they are regular closes in the third mode, these cadences, which have a major third in the final chord, must be considered as expressive in nature. Without going beyond the limits of the chosen mode, they emphasise the joyful nature of the sections sed ut magis convertatur, et vivat and consolationes tua laetificaverunt animam meam in contrasting manner. The text Dominus in templo sancto suo: Dominus in coelo habitatio eius (In Domino confido, bars 58-73) is set in a similar way. However both melody and intervallic distance in the imitative entries suggest first a commixtio with the seventh, and then, after a cadence on F, even a transitory one with the fifth mode. Moreover, in bars 116-124 chords with a major third are frequently found to the words Quoniam iustus Dominus, et iustitias dilexit'.

13 : Itala quae cecidit - Una tibi floret, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 3 Refs., , +Tne]
- p. III : 'Katabasis is used in the introductory imitations of Itala qua cecidit, and moreover the melismatic, descending melodie line of pluet (In Domino confido, bars 101-103) should probably be interpreted in the same way.'

14 : Levavi oculos meos - Dominus custodit te, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 2 Refs., , +T]
- p. V : 'It is also noteworthy that in some cases dissonances (suspensions of 6 5 or 6/4 5/3 , related in each case to the really lowest voice) are used in the sense of affective symbolism, as for example in Angustiae mihi sunt undique (bars 61-64: falsum testimonium, and 81f.: malitiose), Domine quis habitabit (bars 49-51: malum), In die tribulationis meae (bars 36f., 38f.: prae ladirimis), Levavi oculos meos (bars 94f.: ab omni malo), Quanti mercenarii (bars 20-27: Ego autem hic fame pereo) and Tribularer, si nescirem (bars 73f.: dolorum meorum). With this use of dissonances Rore apparently follows the steps of his teacher Willaert, whose motets too contain passages of this kind, when the text suggests such a procedure.'
- p. IV : 'The introduction of accidentals foreign to the mode often leads to the formation of irregular Phrygian cadences, for instance in bars 130-135 of In convertendo Dominus (Euntes ibant et flebant), bars 45-48 and 100-104 of Plange quasi virgo (et amara calde), bars 55-64 of Quanti mercenarii (pecavi), and bars 102f. of Levavi oculos meos (ab omni malo). Also worth mentioning is the music of the question Quid fecisti? (Domine Deus, bars 65-73): together with two regular cadences on the final G (second mode transposed), there are irregular Phrygian cadences in a and d.
Still more unusal is the setting of the words dolorum meorum in corde meo (Tribularer, si nescirem, bars 72ff.): the Phrygian cadence in a which is, strictly speaking, not allowed in the third mode, is followed by a second cadence on d, still further away from the normal Phrygian closes. In contrast to this, Rore makes use of the Phrygian cadences d, a, and e at the end of the section of the motet O altitudo divitiarum beginning with the words et investigabiles vice eius (bars 33-48). All these cadences deviate from the norm adopted by the second mode transposed, though admittedly the cadence on e is somewhat disguised by the cadential progressions of the Cantus and Bassus.'

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15 : Nulla scientia melior - O quam necessaria, 5vv (Motet) - [2, 1 Ref., , +T]
- p. IV-V : 'The employment of unusual cadences brings us to a further method of relating word and tone, which was apparently widely used in the present motets, namely the commixtio tonorum inspired by pictorial or expressive elements in the text. Already Nulla scientia melior provides an impressive example at the words Nihil recte existimat, qui se ipsum ignorat (bars 94-108). The imitations starting on f and c (together with their octave transpositions), the melody formed from the fifth c'-f (c’'-f') and the fourth f'-c' (f"-c", f-c), and the cadences on F of this section (bars 97f., 101 f., 103 f.) belong to the fifth mode, which occurs here as a conscious break with the basic principle of adhering to the mode chosen for the composition. Such a change from the first mode transposed to the upper fourth (G, with b flat) can only be due to consideration for the text. This is true also of the cadence on G in bars 101 f. of Usquequo Domine (praevalui adversus eum) and the unprepared appearance of the fifth a'-e'' (re-la) instead of g-d" (ut-sol) in the superius of the motet Quid gloriaris in malitia (bars 67 ff., Propterea Deus destruet te) - Commixtio of the first with the third mode appears in the present motets particularly in Hesperia cum laeta: here the introduction of the third mode is bound up with the textlines Et modo divitias miratur fertilis agri (bars 21-29) and Quis mihi te similem pinxit, mea dulcis imago? (bars 58-71), and finally with the concluding distich (bars 96ff.).
The return to the first mode is made by bringing in imitative motifs, whose melody is formed from this mode's species of fifth, re-la, before the entry of cadence on d, as in bars 29f. (Tenor, Quintus) and the imitative groups of bars 69ff. and 107ff. It is also in bars 55-57 of the motet In Domino confido (third mode) that we expect a cadence on d at the words Justus autem quid fecit?" ending the prima pars, but instead we get a turn to G on the final chord, a change only to be found otherwise at a „fuggir la cadenza". Thus Rore increases here the impression of confusion. The fact that „commixtio" is an unusual feature is stressed in bars 53-59 of Angustiae mihi sunt undique, where it is applied at the words „qui absconditorum es cognitor" in the melody of Tenor, Bassus, Quintus and Altus. AIthough by no means obvious here, the fifth la-re (d-G or d'-g) does replace the prevailing species sol-ut (c-f), while cadences on g are continually avoided.
The return to the first mode is made by bringing in imitative motifs, whose melody is formed from this mode's species of fifth, re-la, before the entry of cadence on d, as in bars 29f. (Tenor, Quintus) and the imitative groups of bars 69ff. and 107ff. '

16 : O altitudo divitiarum - Quis enim cognovit, 5vv (Motet) - [5, 3 Refs., , +T]
- p. IV : 'The introduction of accidentals foreign to the mode often leads to the formation of irregular Phrygian cadences, for instance in bars 130-135 of In convertendo Dominus (Euntes ibant et flebant), bars 45-48 and 100-104 of Plange quasi virgo (et amara calde), bars 55-64 of Quanti mercenarii (pecavi), and bars 102f. of Levavi oculos meos (ab omni malo). Also worth mentioning is the music of the question Quid fecisti? (Domine Deus, bars 65-73): together with two regular cadences on the final G (second mode transposed), there are irregular Phrygian cadences in a and d.
Still more unusal is the setting of the words dolorum meorum in corde meo (Tribularer, si nescirem, bars 72ff.): the Phrygian cadence in a which is, strictly speaking, not allowed in the third mode, is followed by a second cadence on d, still further away from the normal Phrygian closes. In contrast to this, Rore makes use of the Phrygian cadences d, a, and e at the end of the section of the motet O altitudo divitiarum beginning with the words et investigabiles vice eius (bars 33-48). All these cadences deviate from the norm adopted by the second mode transposed, though admittedly the cadence on e is somewhat disguised by the cadential progressions of the Cantus and Bassus.'
- p. III : 'The line O altitudo divitiarum on the other hand is set to the imitative entry of upper fifth to final, so unusual in the second mode. '

17 : Plange quasi virgo - Accingite vos, 5vv (Motet) - [2, 2 Refs., , +Tfe]
- p. IV : 'The introduction of accidentals foreign to the mode often leads to the formation of irregular Phrygian cadences, for instance in bars 130-135 of In convertendo Dominus (Euntes ibant et flebant), bars 45-48 and 100-104 of Plange quasi virgo (et amara calde), bars 55-64 of Quanti mercenarii (pecavi), and bars 102f. of Levavi oculos meos (ab omni malo). Also worth mentioning is the music of the question Quid fecisti? (Domine Deus, bars 65-73): together with two regular cadences on the final G (second mode transposed), there are irregular Phrygian cadences in a and d.
Still more unusal is the setting of the words dolorum meorum in corde meo (Tribularer, si nescirem, bars 72ff.): the Phrygian cadence in a which is, strictly speaking, not allowed in the third mode, is followed by a second cadence on d, still further away from the normal Phrygian closes. In contrast to this, Rore makes use of the Phrygian cadences d, a, and e at the end of the section of the motet O altitudo divitiarum beginning with the words et investigabiles vice eius (bars 33-48). All these cadences deviate from the norm adopted by the second mode transposed, though admittedly the cadence on e is somewhat disguised by the cadential progressions of the Cantus and Bassus.'

18 : Pulchrior Italicis, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 2 Refs., , +T]
- p. IV : 'It is probably no accident that the text non est mortali semine nata (Pulchrior Italicis, bars 42-44 and 51-55) is performed on its first and last appearances by the deeper voices only.'

19 : Quanti mercenarii - Pater, peccavi, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 2 Refs., , +T]
- p. V : 'It is also noteworthy that in some cases dissonances (suspensions of 6 5 or 6/4 5/3 , related in each case to the really lowest voice) are used in the sense of affective symbolism, as for example in Angustiae mihi sunt undique (bars 61-64: falsum testimonium, and 81f.: malitiose), Domine quis habitabit (bars 49-51: malum), In die tribulationis meae (bars 36f., 38f.: prae ladirimis), Levavi oculos meos (bars 94f.: ab omni malo), Quanti mercenarii (bars 20-27: Ego autem hic fame pereo) and Tribularer, si nescirem (bars 73f.: dolorum meorum). With this use of dissonances Rore apparently follows the steps of his teacher Willaert, whose motets too contain passages of this kind, when the text suggests such a procedure.'
- p. IV : 'The introduction of accidentals foreign to the mode often leads to the formation of irregular Phrygian cadences, for instance in bars 130-135 of In convertendo Dominus (Euntes ibant et flebant), bars 45-48 and 100-104 of Plange quasi virgo (et amara calde), bars 55-64 of Quanti mercenarii (pecavi), and bars 102f. of Levavi oculos meos (ab omni malo). Also worth mentioning is the music of the question Quid fecisti? (Domine Deus, bars 65-73): together with two regular cadences on the final G (second mode transposed), there are irregular Phrygian cadences in a and d.
Still more unusal is the setting of the words dolorum meorum in corde meo (Tribularer, si nescirem, bars 72ff.): the Phrygian cadence in a which is, strictly speaking, not allowed in the third mode, is followed by a second cadence on d, still further away from the normal Phrygian closes. In contrast to this, Rore makes use of the Phrygian cadences d, a, and e at the end of the section of the motet O altitudo divitiarum beginning with the words et investigabiles vice eius (bars 33-48). All these cadences deviate from the norm adopted by the second mode transposed, though admittedly the cadence on e is somewhat disguised by the cadential progressions of the Cantus and Bassus.'

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20 : Quid gloriaris in malitia - Videbunt iusti, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 1 Ref., , +T]
- p. IV-V : 'The employment of unusual cadences brings us to a further method of relating word and tone, which was apparently widely used in the present motets, namely the commixtio tonorum inspired by pictorial or expressive elements in the text. Already Nulla scientia melior provides an impressive example at the words Nihil recte existimat, qui se ipsum ignorat (bars 94-108). The imitations starting on f and c (together with their octave transpositions), the melody formed from the fifth c'-f (c’'-f') and the fourth f'-c' (f"-c", f-c), and the cadences on F of this section (bars 97f., 101 f., 103 f.) belong to the fifth mode, which occurs here as a conscious break with the basic principle of adhering to the mode chosen for the composition. Such a change from the first mode transposed to the upper fourth (G, with b flat) can only be due to consideration for the text. This is true also of the cadence on G in bars 101 f. of Usquequo Domine (praevalui adversus eum) and the unprepared appearance of the fifth a'-e'' (re-la) instead of g-d" (ut-sol) in the superius of the motet Quid gloriaris in malitia (bars 67 ff., Propterea Deus destruet te) - Commixtio of the first with the third mode appears in the present motets particularly in Hesperia cum laeta: here the introduction of the third mode is bound up with the textlines Et modo divitias miratur fertilis agri (bars 21-29) and Quis mihi te similem pinxit, mea dulcis imago? (bars 58-71), and finally with the concluding distich (bars 96ff.).
The return to the first mode is made by bringing in imitative motifs, whose melody is formed from this mode's species of fifth, re-la, before the entry of cadence on d, as in bars 29f. (Tenor, Quintus) and the imitative groups of bars 69ff. and 107ff. It is also in bars 55-57 of the motet In Domino confido (third mode) that we expect a cadence on d at the words Justus autem quid fecit?" ending the prima pars, but instead we get a turn to G on the final chord, a change only to be found otherwise at a „fuggir la cadenza". Thus Rore increases here the impression of confusion. The fact that „commixtio" is an unusual feature is stressed in bars 53-59 of Angustiae mihi sunt undique, where it is applied at the words „qui absconditorum es cognitor" in the melody of Tenor, Bassus, Quintus and Altus. AIthough by no means obvious here, the fifth la-re (d-G or d'-g) does replace the prevailing species sol-ut (c-f), while cadences on g are continually avoided.
The return to the first mode is made by bringing in imitative motifs, whose melody is formed from this mode's species of fifth, re-la, before the entry of cadence on d, as in bars 29f. (Tenor, Quintus) and the imitative groups of bars 69ff. and 107ff. '

21 : Si ignoras te - Surge, propera, 5vv (Motet) - [0, 1 Ref., , +T]
- p. IV : 'Often semitones are introduced owing to textual considerations, though they may be foreign to the prevailing mode (figure of Pathopoiia). This happens for example in bars 77 (dolorem) and 89 (in morte) of Usquequo Domine, and in bars 67f. (columba mea) of Si ignoras te. '

22 : Tribularer, si nescirem - Secundum multitudinem, 5vv (Motet) - [1, 3 Refs., , +T]
- p. IV : 'The introduction of accidentals foreign to the mode often leads to the formation of irregular Phrygian cadences, for instance in bars 130-135 of In convertendo Dominus (Euntes ibant et flebant), bars 45-48 and 100-104 of Plange quasi virgo (et amara calde), bars 55-64 of Quanti mercenarii (pecavi), and bars 102f. of Levavi oculos meos (ab omni malo). Also worth mentioning is the music of the question Quid fecisti? (Domine Deus, bars 65-73): together with two regular cadences on the final G (second mode transposed), there are irregular Phrygian cadences in a and d.
Still more unusal is the setting of the words dolorum meorum in corde meo (Tribularer, si nescirem, bars 72ff.): the Phrygian cadence in a which is, strictly speaking, not allowed in the third mode, is followed by a second cadence on d, still further away from the normal Phrygian closes. In contrast to this, Rore makes use of the Phrygian cadences d, a, and e at the end of the section of the motet O altitudo divitiarum beginning with the words et investigabiles vice eius (bars 33-48). All these cadences deviate from the norm adopted by the second mode transposed, though admittedly the cadence on e is somewhat disguised by the cadential progressions of the Cantus and Bassus.'
- p. V : 'It is also noteworthy that in some cases dissonances (suspensions of 6 5 or 6/4 5/3 , related in each case to the really lowest voice) are used in the sense of affective symbolism, as for example in Angustiae mihi sunt undique (bars 61-64: falsum testimonium, and 81f.: malitiose), Domine quis habitabit (bars 49-51: malum), In die tribulationis meae (bars 36f., 38f.: prae ladirimis), Levavi oculos meos (bars 94f.: ab omni malo), Quanti mercenarii (bars 20-27: Ego autem hic fame pereo) and Tribularer, si nescirem (bars 73f.: dolorum meorum). With this use of dissonances Rore apparently follows the steps of his teacher Willaert, whose motets too contain passages of this kind, when the text suggests such a procedure.'
- p. V : 'Traces of the modern dualism of major and minor are to be found clearly enough in a few motets belonging to the third mode. Thus we find several cadences on G and C one after the other in Tribularer, si nescirem (bars 29-40 and 80-91). Although they are regular closes in the third mode, these cadences, which have a major third in the final chord, must be considered as expressive in nature. Without going beyond the limits of the chosen mode, they emphasise the joyful nature of the sections sed ut magis convertatur, et vivat and consolationes tua laetificaverunt animam meam in contrasting manner. The text Dominus in templo sancto suo: Dominus in coelo habitatio eius (In Domino confido, bars 58-73) is set in a similar way. However both melody and intervallic distance in the imitative entries suggest first a commixtio with the seventh, and then, after a cadence on F, even a transitory one with the fifth mode. Moreover, in bars 116-124 chords with a major third are frequently found to the words Quoniam iustus Dominus, et iustitias dilexit'.

23 : Usquequo Domine - Illumina oculos meos, 5vv (Motet) - [1, 3 Refs., , +Tne]
- p. IV : 'Often semitones are introduced owing to textual considerations, though they may be foreign to the prevailing mode (figure of Pathopoiia). This happens for example in bars 77 (dolorem) and 89 (in morte) of Usquequo Domine, and in bars 67f. (columba mea) of Si ignoras te. '
- p. IV : 'In a similar way we find katabasis in the words in morte (Usquequo Domine, Cantus, bars 8 5 f.), or on mors mihi est (Angustiae mihi sunt undique, bars 29-33).'
- p. IV-V : 'The employment of unusual cadences brings us to a further method of relating word and tone, which was apparently widely used in the present motets, namely the commixtio tonorum inspired by pictorial or expressive elements in the text. Already Nulla scientia melior provides an impressive example at the words Nihil recte existimat, qui se ipsum ignorat (bars 94-108). The imitations starting on f and c (together with their octave transpositions), the melody formed from the fifth c'-f (c’'-f') and the fourth f'-c' (f"-c", f-c), and the cadences on F of this section (bars 97f., 101 f., 103 f.) belong to the fifth mode, which occurs here as a conscious break with the basic principle of adhering to the mode chosen for the composition. Such a change from the first mode transposed to the upper fourth (G, with b flat) can only be due to consideration for the text. This is true also of the cadence on G in bars 101 f. of Usquequo Domine (praevalui adversus eum) and the unprepared appearance of the fifth a'-e'' (re-la) instead of g-d" (ut-sol) in the superius of the motet Quid gloriaris in malitia (bars 67 ff., Propterea Deus destruet te) - Commixtio of the first with the third mode appears in the present motets particularly in Hesperia cum laeta: here the introduction of the third mode is bound up with the textlines Et modo divitias miratur fertilis agri (bars 21-29) and Quis mihi te similem pinxit, mea dulcis imago? (bars 58-71), and finally with the concluding distich (bars 96ff.).
The return to the first mode is made by bringing in imitative motifs, whose melody is formed from this mode's species of fifth, re-la, before the entry of cadence on d, as in bars 29f. (Tenor, Quintus) and the imitative groups of bars 69ff. and 107ff. It is also in bars 55-57 of the motet In Domino confido (third mode) that we expect a cadence on d at the words Justus autem quid fecit?" ending the prima pars, but instead we get a turn to G on the final chord, a change only to be found otherwise at a „fuggir la cadenza". Thus Rore increases here the impression of confusion. The fact that „commixtio" is an unusual feature is stressed in bars 53-59 of Angustiae mihi sunt undique, where it is applied at the words „qui absconditorum es cognitor" in the melody of Tenor, Bassus, Quintus and Altus. AIthough by no means obvious here, the fifth la-re (d-G or d'-g) does replace the prevailing species sol-ut (c-f), while cadences on g are continually avoided.
The return to the first mode is made by bringing in imitative motifs, whose melody is formed from this mode's species of fifth, re-la, before the entry of cadence on d, as in bars 29f. (Tenor, Quintus) and the imitative groups of bars 69ff. and 107ff. '


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Pagina laatst bewerkt : 4/11/2017 15:44:55
Eigen code : #Ref_6245